Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Because Adventures Don't Have to be Big Ones to be Fun Ones

About thirty minutes from our house is the tiny Ute Indian Museum, and though it takes only about fifteen minutes to go through, it is a major bore for a four-year-old who's used to the fabulously big and dinosaur-filled Denver Museum of Nature and Science. But, we forced William to go with us anyway, as Cathy and I went on a fact-finding field trip last week and -- all things considered, the little guy bore up pretty well.  He only whined a little as Cathy and I went around the exhibits learning about the history of the great 19th century Indian leader of our valley, Chief Ouray, and his charming wife Chipeta (whom it is rumored was a devout Catholic...).  And while we marveled over the pretty Indian dresses and the beautiful bead-work of the Utes, William only marveled that he was stuck indoors.  He was a boy with only one thing on his mind: tipis.  Outside the museum, on the beautiful grounds seven or eight tipis stood ready to be explored.  He'd seen them when we came in; he knew we'd seen them.  Why on earth were we wandering around a boring museum that didn't even have dinosaurs, when there were tipis outside??  But, finally.  finally.  Cathy and I were finished looking and Yuyum got to go out and explore. 
Woopee!  Sometimes patience (ahem) is rewarded.











Is this cool or what?
We want one.

Make sure and visit A Bit of the Blarney for more Adventure Tours!

3 comments:

GrandmaK said...

Thank you for sharing your adventure!!!! I have always been in awe of those who came before us and lived in ways we could not have imagined. Consider the skill and hard work it took to construct this home. Oh my. Really beautiful pictures taken from inside. William did do well!!! Thank you for this "Adventure." Life is an adventure every day!!! ;) Cathy

MightyMom said...

Me too!

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

I'm visiitng from Cathy's Adventure Tours...wonderful post! I have always been fascinated with the lives of the Native Americans.