Monday, July 7, 2008

Remember Dagwood and Blondie?

Skip Young created the Blondie comic strip in 1930, around the character of a beautiful flighty blonde flapper, playing the field with a number of suiters. Dagwood was a rich, slightly goofy playboy, one of many names on Blondie's dance card. But in 1933, a match was made in comic book heaven when the two tied the knot.

It was a funny papers struggle for Dagwood and Blondie from the beginning. Dagwood's tycoon father had disinherited him. (Imagine anyone thinking Blondie was a golddigger!) It was a tough break for the young cartoon couple, but a stroke of genius by Skip Young. The Great Depression was in full swing at that time, and struggling Americans could identify with Dagwood and Blondie's hard times. And we still relate to them, good times and tough times. It's just easy to identify with their day-to-dayness. Blondie and Dagwood's love match has endured for 75 years now! They began as the quintessential couple of the thirties, but have survived to be just the quintessential couple, period.

How much do you think we have changed our expectations and responsibilities as husbands and wives from the thirties to today? There's a quiz out there to see how we'd do compared to values, habits, and culture of 75 years ago.
Here's how I scored:

(Just call me Blondie)






102




As a 1930s wife, I am
Very Superior




Take the test!


Here's how my wonderful, 1930's-style hubby rated:

(He's too sensible to be called Dagwood)






144


As a 1930s husband, I am
Very Superior


Take the test!

(I filled in his test for him, with perfectly honest answers (Of course!) ~ as he was busy dutifully hanging sheetrock this evening.)

H/T: Ann at A.R.T. Servant

2 comments:

Soutenus said...

A quick note from A Catholic Notebook. . . . you can add your favorite books to the Blogger's Choice Catholic Reading List until Wednesday. The deadline was extended due to some special requests! I can't wait to see and share the results at the end of the week. Come on by!

Memarie Lane said...

It sounds like comics were A LOT better then than they are now. I did well on that test too, but not quite as well as you. :P